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Why are many Gambians dying young? The environmental factor

Some might wonder why malaria is endemic in The Gambia. It used to be a seasonal illness but not anymore. The malarial scourge used to be during the rainy season. In recent years, we started seeing malaria cases all year round. Government and non-governmental agencies undoubtedly have created a dent in the malarial problem we have been tackling for years but there is still room for improvement. Mosquitoes are agents for malaria disease and they thrive well in unsuitable environmental conditions. Environmental factors such as soil, water and air contamination are contributing factors to the Gambian morbidity (illness) and mortality (death) rates of which malaria is among the leading causes...

Berkeley Rice on IM Garba-Jahumpa (Excerpts from Enter Gambia, Birth of an Improbable Nation)

The most notorious case in recent years involving the use of party funds for private gain came to light when Alasan N'Dure, Propaganda Secretary of The Gambia Congress Party, resigned in protest over alleged misuse of party money by its leader, IM Garba-Jahumpa. According to Mr N'Dure, Jahumpa had squandered, among other sums, a large donation from “an international body” (reportedly Red China). He used what was left as a down payment on a party vehicle, the rental fees from which he kept. When the party's executive board tried to take over the vehicle, Jahumpa sold it to a party member...

Why are many Gambians dying young? (Too many (maternal) deaths!) part 3

One of the crucial health indicators of any nation is the reproductive health of its people. Maternal mortality and morbidity is a good measure of how well a country is taking care of its vulnerable population. There are 3-4 groups of people in a society that all citizens have the moral obligation to protect and preserve....

Ebola

West African nations scrambled on Tuesday to contain an outbreak of the deadly Ebola virus suspected to have killed at least 59 people in Guinea, with symptoms of the disease reported in neighboring Sierra Leone and Liberia as well. The spread of Ebola, one of the most lethal infectious diseases known, has spooked nations with weak health care systems. In Guinea's southeast, home to all the confirmed cases, residents are avoiding large gatherings and prices in some markets have spiked as transporters avoid the area.

Gambia: Only ‘9 per cent married women use contraceptives’

The preliminary report of The Gambia's demographic and health survey has revealed that contraceptive prevalence in The Gambia is very low. The report shows empirical evidence that “only 9 percent of currently married women use a contraceptive method of any kind, and 8 percent use a modern method.”...

‘Great Senegambia Debate’ advance team due in Banjul today

As part of preparations for the much-anticipated forum called to sensitise Senegalese and Gambian populace and government on the need for close integration of the people of the two nations, dubbed 'The Senegambia Debate', a high-powered delegation from Senegal led by renowned media consultant, subject specialist and proprietor of KYS-GROUP Yoro Dia, are expected in Banjul this evening to check on the arrangements....

What happened to Banjul? My story (Part 2)

It didn't take long after the sewage project was finished for the problem of pipe blockage, leakage and overflow to surface. The quality of the work was perfunctory at best (merci beaucoup SOBEA!). In constructing the sewage system, SOBEA used smaller pipes that were frequently choking and causing the system to overflow. Ultimately, the whole problem basically came down to lack of proper planning by the government. For a project of such magnitude, it is critical that the citizens are sensitised prior to commencing the project, and that reliable management and maintenance arrangements put in place to remove blockages, which are more frequent than with conventional sewerage.....

Our history was written by aliens – Juka Jabang

The executive director of the West Africa International School, WAIS, Mrs Juka Jabang, has told students gathered at the first annual edition of the 'African Heritage Week' that the history of the African continent “was written by aliens, non Africans.”...

Female circumcision will never die in Gambia (Lamin ‘ngansinbaa’ Amie Jallow vows)

Mrs Amie Jallow, the leading female circumciser 'ngansing baa' in Lamin and satellite villages, has told The Standard yesterday that she will never stop the practice of female circumcision and that it is a traditional cultural practice “that will never die in this land of The Gambia”....

What happened to Banjul? My story (Part 1)

Banjul was never a beautiful city, but it had character and charm. The architecture was poor, but the atmosphere was magnificent. It was dark half the time at night (GUC), but it had a bright spirit. Banjul was fun! During the colonial era, Banjul was relatively clean and well maintained. The Board of Health (aka 'bodorfel') that was set up had strict health codes that were regularly enforced. Health inspectors routinely inspected homes, and fines were handed out to those who were found to be in violation. Inspectors were generally unforgiving, and that forced Waa Banjul to be on their “cleaning toes” at all times. Nervousness filled the air in every home, as home inspections drew near. Even drinking water stored in “ndals” were inspected, and the "kamas" too. The inspections were thorough and the sanctions were stiff. Waa Banjul definitely had a legitimate reason to be nervous......

British college students visit The Standard

Over 25 college students and seven lecturers from Andover and Sparsholt College, England, who are on a cross campus trip to The Gambia visited The Standard newspaper offices on Friday.....

Berkeley Rice on Momodou Moussa N’jie (Excerpts from Enter Gambia, Birth of an Improbable Nation)

There is one Gambian, who many feel is the richest man in the country today [1965]. His name is Alhadji Momodou Moussa N'jie. Although Mr N'jie can neither read nor write, he has amassed a fortune by simply doing well what hundreds of other Gambian traders do - buying and selling. Rumours abound in Bathurst about his dealings and the extent of his wealth, and one can always hear of his latest coup over a beer in the Atlantic lounge. His independence gift of US$2,800, though larger than that from many countries, startled no one. “Momodou,” as he is commonly known, appears frequently throughout the country, looking after his affairs. An up-river official says, “He extends credit to all the Serahulis in the provinces.” A bank official says, “He is used as a business agent by Gambians who haven't a clue about formal transactions.” I once saw him in the bank, assisting a Mauritanian cattleman from Senegal who spoke only Arabic. The dark-skinned Moor had piles of dirty Senegalese francs tied up in a piece of cloth, and Mr N'jie was helping him fill out some forms to transfer the money to an associate in Senegal.....

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NAM urges Gov’t to act on shooting of Gambian by Senegalese security

By Mafugi Ceesay The National Assembly Member for Kantora has complained that the Minister of Defense and other authorities have ignored his letter requesting for...