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City of Banjul
Sunday, September 20, 2020

Japan boosts clinic with over D3 Million

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Part of the Japanese government’s Grant Assistance for Grassroots Human Security Projects, the grant aims to improve the clinic’s progress on communicable diseases, such as malaria, respiratory infection and diarrheal diseases to chronic and non-communicable diseases such as diabetes, hypertension and strokes in The Gambia.

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The first secretary of the embassy, Ms Akiko Takano, said her government was helping the “clinic achieve its very important mission of relieving people’s suffering”.

At the signing ceremony held at the Westfield Clinic grounds at Westfield Junction, the Japanese diplomat said: “Like in other developing countries, the trend of common causes of illness and death are changing from communicable diseases such as malaria, respiratory infection and diarrheal diseases to chronic and non-communicable diseases such as diabetes, hypertension and strokes in The Gambia as well. The measures to deal with this change are an issue of concern not only for the government but also at the local level.

“The contract we have signed will allow the Westfield Clinic to receive 73, 314 euros assigned to the purchase of medical equipment, including a haematology analyser, an electrolyte analyser, clinical chemistry analyser, and ultrasound scanner, microscope and a generator. This support is implemented within the framework of the Japanese Grant Assistance for Grass-Roots Human Security Projects which is designed to support community based initiatives addressing various development issues, mainly basic human needs. Good health is evidently one of the pillars of human security. I hope the project will secure improved access to essential diagnosis service of non-communicable diseases, especially by enabling a variety of blood tests which will provide a timely and reliable medical service.”

According to Takano, at the completion of the project, it is hoped that “not only the yearly 15,000 patients of the clinic, but also approximately 380, 000 in Kanifing Municipality and peripheral rural residents will be able to receive efficient and accurate medical diagnosis, so that morbidity and death rate in The Gambia could be ameliorated.”

Takano said she wished the project develop a strong link not only between Japan and The Gambia but also between the Gambian and Japanese peoples.

The chairperson of the clinic’s board of trustees, Mr Sheriff Tambedou said: “The board is grateful to the government and people of Japan for this grant and for their continued support to social development projects in The Gambia.”

Dr Ayo Palmer, medical director of the clinic, moderated the event. 

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