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Wednesday, November 25, 2020

Letters to the Editor

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A moment to inhale national pride

Dear editor,

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Being an opposition doesn’t mean opposing every action by the head of state. There are times when even advanced democracies like America, Britain, France and the developed, consolidated countries rejoice and appreciate their head of state.

President Barrow demonstrated what is unique and a signature mark of Gambians, ‘humility and respect for all’. This doesn’t mean we don’t have our fair share of cocky, elitist and self-adulating condescending perfectionist who can’t see beyond themselves.
The speech by Barrow acknowledging the role of the Gambian diaspora in a global gathering for me did it. The world, especially Europe and America, see African migrants as a nuisance and an unwanted bother. However, our president acknowledged us and went further to talk about his pain in seeing the youths embarking on the perilous dangerous backway migration journeys.
He lamented that the backway youths shouldn’t be dismissed as mere ‘economic migrants’. He stated, ‘these youth embarked on this death trap journeys effects’.
In essence, the world (Gambia, Africa) needs to provide an enabling environment for the African youth to be productive and appreciated.

The message of gratitude to the ECOWAS, Senegal, AU and the U.N Africa branch is also noteworthy.
The reform agendas to be pursued in the Gambia, Barrow highlighted will be the defining factor in shaping a new Gambia. These reforms will require some level of technical assistance from the regional bloc and the U.N expert agencies.
The roundtable donor conference to be held will also help negotiate the level of financial support the Gambia will get to accelerate economic growth and tackle the needed infrastructural and physical progress we yearn for.

President Barrow lamented critically on the need for moving on from a terrible 2-decade of bad existence and that will require harmonising all the democratic instruments to attain national stability and regional and global respectability.
The speech is a brilliant one and Barrow has the intention and focus to take us ahead. This will not be a quick fix, however, with the response we are seeing from international agencies and the goodwill of committed Gambians we will get to the Promised Land.

Although absorbing competent Gambians will be crucial in the national agenda, patience, and greater understanding is needed in assisting the President to achieve some success. The economic stability achieved in a short period of time is tremendous, from 1 month import cover to 4 months and with the dalasi strengthening and inflation level falling, we are in good hands.
Law and order issues and the commissions taking place now, with two more to come, Gambians will have abundant opportunity to learn and appreciate the environment of the rule of law, good governance and accountability. The Commonwealth empowering our parliamentarians and other media training of the Gambian journalists, we can be proud of what we achieve in ushering in a new Gambia
Burying the relics of Jammeh will take some time, but it will happen. Salute you, Mr President.

 

Suntou Touray
Coventry, UK

Post-disaster possibilities in Kuntaur

Dear editor,

In the field of public health disaster and outbreaks are correlated. This is why during disaster response public health professionals are involved to do assessment of possible confounders that may fan outbreaks.
The impact of post disaster (floods) can be:
The emergence of diseases such as malaria, typhoid fever and cholera as people are displaced internally and housed in schools and other strategic locations. Overcrowding may be the order of the day, this will result to pressure on basic amenities such as potable water. Unhygienic conditions may result to the outbreaks of the above mentioned diseases.
Overcrowding can cause proliferation of communicable diseases in which both morbidity and mortality may be high.

The solution is a well-coordinated disaster response strategy should be in place. Such as;
1. Overcrowding cannot be avoided as a result of unavailable housing but proper natural ventilation maybe provided to habitants.
2. Disinfection of utensils and other food preparation materials.
3. Provision of bed nets to prevent or minimize mosquito bites.
4. Provisions of toilets facilities to avoid fecal oral route to prevent diseases such as diarrhea, dysentery, cholera and typhoid fever.

Ousman Bah
Fajikunda

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